Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Did You Purchase a Home in 2008? What You Need to Know


Individuals who purchased a home in 2008 and took advantage of the First Time Homebuyer Tax Credit—keep reading. I consulted with Ryan L. Ross, CPA at the Leawood Office Business Center in Leawood, Kansas. He provided some insight into what you need to know as a seller who purchased their home in 2008 and claimed a credit.

First, for all homes purchased in 2008, the First-Time Homebuyer Credit is repaid over 15 years or sooner if the home is sold or ceased to be the taxpayer’s main home. For homes purchased after December 31, 2008, the credit must be repaid only if the home is sold or ceases to be the taxpayer’s main home within 36 months of the date of purchase.

Other things to note: Form 5405, Repayment of the First-Time Homebuyer Credit, must be filed for the year the home is sold or ceases to be the taxpayer’s main home. 

Be sure to look into exceptions to this repayment rule, too. These exceptions include:
  • The repayment is limited to the gain on the sale of the home. Gain is typically computed by subtracting the original cost and improvements from the sales price;
  • The home is destroyed or condemned, and a new home is purchased;
  • Extended duty of military personnel or intelligence officials;
  • Death of the taxpayer.

For more information, consult your tax advisor or contact me to get in touch with someone who can help.

Monday, February 10, 2014

The Numbers Are In! 2014’s Remodeling Projects With the Highest Cost Recouped in Kansas City

Last year, I published a blog titled The Top 10 Remodeling Projects with the Highest Cost Recouped in Kansas City that covered the home remodeling projects that gave homeowners the highest rate of return in 2013. Now that 2013 has come and gone, it’s time to see which remodeling projects will give you the best return on investment in 2014!

According to Remodeling, the top 10 remodeling projects with the highest cost recouped in Kansas City this year are:

     1.  Garage Door Replacement:

Remove and dispose of existing 16x7-foot garage door and tracks. Install new 4-section garage door on new galvanized steel tracks; reuse existing motorized opener. New door is uninsulated, single-layer, embossed steel with two coats of baked-on paint, galvanized steel hinges, and nylon rollers. 10-year limited warranty.

Cost: $1,604
Resale value: $1,233
Cost recouped: 77.0%

2.  Minor Kitchen Remodel:

In a functional but dated 200-square-foot kitchen with 30 linear feet of cabinetry and countertops, leave cabinet boxes in place but replace fronts with new raised-panel wood doors and drawers, including new hardware. Replace wall oven and cooktop with new energy-efficient models. Replace laminate countertops; install midpriced sink and faucet. Repaint trim, add wall covering, and remove and replace resilient flooring.

Cost: $19,854
 Resale value: $14,941
Cost recouped: 75.3%

3.  Entry Door Replacement (Steel):

Remove existing 3-0/6-8 entry door and jambs and replace with new 20-gauge steel unit, including clear dual-pane half-glass panel, jambs, and aluminum threshold with composite stop. Door is factory finished with same color both sides. Exterior brick-mold and 2.5-inch interior colonial or ranch casings in poplar or equal prefinished to match door color. Replace existing lockset with new bored-lock in brass or antique-brass finish.

Cost: $1,240
Resale value: $837
Cost recouped: 67.5%

4.  Deck Addition (Wood):

Add a 16-by-20-foot deck using pressure-treated joists supported by 4x4 posts anchored to concrete piers. Install pressure-treated deck boards in a simple linear pattern. Include a built-in bench and planter of the same decking material. Include stairs, assuming three steps to grade. Provide a complete railing system using pressure-treated wood posts, railings, and balusters.

Cost: $10,311
Resale value: $6,926
Cost recouped: 67.2%

5.  Bathroom Remodel:

Update an existing 5-by-7-foot bathroom. Replace all fixtures to include 30-by-60-inch porcelain-on-steel tub with 4-by-4-inch ceramic tile surround; new single-lever temperature and pressure-balanced shower control; standard white toilet; solid-surface vanity counter with integral sink; recessed medicine cabinet with light; ceramic tile floor; vinyl wallpaper.

Cost: $17,439
Resale value: $11,444
Cost recouped: 65.6%

6.  Two-story Addition:

Add a first-floor family room and a second-floor bedroom with full bathroom in a 24-by-16-foot two-story wing over a crawlspace. Add new HVAC system to handle addition; electrical wiring to code.

Family room: Include a prefabricated gas fireplace; 11 3-by-5-foot double-hung insulated clad-wood windows; an atrium-style exterior door; carpeted floors; painted drywall on walls and ceiling; and painted trim.

Bathroom: 5 by 8 feet. Include a one-piece fiberglass tub/shower unit; standard white toilet; wood vanity with solid-surface countertop; resilient vinyl flooring; and mirrored medicine cabinet with built-in light strip; papered walls; and painted trim; exhaust fan. Bedroom: Include walk-in closet/dressing area; carpet; painted walls, ceiling, and trim; general and spot lighting.

Cost: $165,580
Resale value: $106,054
Cost recouped: 64.1%

7.  Deck Addition (Composite):

Add a 16-by-20-foot deck using pressure-treated joists supported by 4x4 posts anchored to concrete piers. Install composite deck material in a simple linear pattern. Include a built-in bench and planter of the same decking material. Include stairs, assuming three steps to grade. Provide a complete railing using a matching system made of the same composite as the decking material.

Cost: $16,291
Resale value: $10,297
Cost recouped: 63.2%

8.  Siding Replacement (Vinyl):

Replace 1,250 square feet of existing siding with new vinyl siding, including all trim.

Cost: $12,411
Resale value: $7,803
Cost recouped: 62.9%

9.  Major Kitchen Remodel:

Update an outmoded 200-square-foot kitchen with a functional layout of 30 linear feet of semi-custom wood cabinets, including a 3-by-5-foot island; laminate countertops; and standard double-tub stainless-steel sink with standard single-lever faucet. Include energy-efficient wall oven, cooktop, ventilation system, built-in microwave, dishwasher, garbage disposal, and custom lighting. Add new resilient flooring. Finish with painted walls, trim, and ceiling.

Cost: $57,520
Resale value: $36,044
Cost recouped: 62.7%

10.  Attic Bedroom:

Convert unfinished attic space to a 15-by-15-foot bedroom and a 5-by-7-foot bathroom with shower. Include a 15-foot shed dormer, four new windows, and closet space under the eaves. Insulate and finish ceiling and walls. Carpet floor. Extend existing HVAC to new space; provide electrical wiring and lighting to code. Retain existing stairs, but add rail and baluster around stairwell.

Cost: $53,696
Resale value: $32,371
Cost recouped: 60.3%

Want to learn more about buying or selling a home in the Kansas City and Overland Park areas? Check out my Facebook page.

Friday, January 24, 2014

January is Radon Awareness Month – Get Your Home Tested For Only $100!

Image credit: Shane Lyle, Geology Extension
Kansas Geological Survey

January has been designated as Radon Awareness Month by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. But as a homeowner, do you even know what radon is? 

I caught up with my good friend John Clason with Crown Home Inspections to learn a little bit more.  In honor of Radon Awareness Month, John isn’t just inspecting homes for their radon levels, he’s doing it at a discounted price!

Before I let you in on the discount details, let’s explore what radon is and why your home may need to be tested.

As mentioned in a previous Team Ohlde blog post, radon is a silent and odorless gas that could leak into homes from the natural decay of uranium present in different types of soil. Radon contains cancer-causing alpha particles that are drawn from parched soil through draught-driven cracks in home foundation. Believe it or not, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, only behind smoking. The EPA estimates that approximately 22,000 people die each year from lung cancer caused by radon.
So as you can infer, having high radon levels in your home can be extremely dangerous. But the even scarier part is that it’s almost impossible to tell what radon levels your home has unless you do a radon test.  A radon tests includes a 48-hour moderation of the home. John at Crown Home Inspections uses an electric continue radon monitor that tells the radon level for each hour during the test and provides an overall reading at the end.

After the test, homeowners receive an overview of their home’s radon levels. Any home with a radon level of 4.0 picocuries per liter of air or higher should act immediately.  Luckily, it’s easy to fix any high levels of radon.

What’s the fix exactly?  A radon mitigation system can be installed in a home in about 3-4 hours.

As the cliché phrase goes, it’s better to be safe than sorry! Take the month of January to schedule a radon testing for your home from Crown Home Inspections for just $100 (a $25 discount off the regular price through February 15, 2014!).  Visit Crown Home Inspections website to learn more.


Want more help with keeping your home safe and in shape? Check out my list of local services providers! Click here

Friday, November 15, 2013

Fannie Mae Changes Guides on Gift Funds

Lately, I’ve been getting quite a few questions from homebuyers about the major changes to Fannie Mae (FNMA).  For starters, allow me to define Fannie Mae: Fannie Mae is a government-sponsored enterprise that primarily buys mortgages from lenders for cash or pools them and sells them as mortgage-backed securities to investors on the open market. 

So what’s changing about FNMA?  Like most industries, nothing stays the same for long—and real estate is no exception.  There are many changes coming along that will affect homebuyers in 2014 and one of those is a new FNMA rule with gift down payments.

In the past, most homebuyers have not had the opportunity to use 100% “gift funds” (a financial gift from a spouse or other blood relative, even one’s employer) for their down payment.  So many used the 3% down Conventional (97 LTV) or 3.5% down FHA option, 100% gift (96.5 LTV) options when purchasing a home or they would use a conventional loan with 5% down. But because of major changes to the real estate market, FNMA is now allowing homebuyers to use gift funds to make their 5% down payment on a conventional loan, making the 5% (95 LTV) option much more attainable, particularly for first-time home buyers.

So what does this mean for homebuyers exactly?  A whole lot of opportunity.  In order to get an understanding of this change, I talked with Jim Griffiths, a Mortgage Advisor at Stonegate Mortgage.

“There really is no downside to this change for borrowers,” explains Jim.  “While the 3% down option went away, this allows more home buyers access to conventional lending programs.  It’s perfect for first-time homebuyers who may not have had enough time to save up enough of their own cash reserves to make a down payment.  They can really use this to their advantage.”

The table below will help homebuyers further understand this change and see the minimum borrower contribution requirements for transactions that contain gifts:


As Griffiths stated, with this change, homebuyers are putting more skin in the game, not to mention more investment in the market.  The message here is that investors want to see more “skin in the game” even though it may be 100% gifted funds. 

“Bottom line, if someone can help you with your 5% down payment, you now have that option,” says Griffiths.  “Conventional lending provides a much less expensive option from a mortgage insurance perspective, which lowers the overall monthly payment.  In the long run, it can also be cheaper than an FHA loan. My recommendation is that if it’s available, take advantage of it.”

If you would like to take advantage of this new loan opportunity and begin the home buying process, please contact me today to schedule a private consultation.
Phone: 913.568.7355
Website: www.toddohlde.com 

Or, if you have more questions regarding the new Fannie Mae guides, or if you want to inquire about qualifying for a home loan, please contact Jim Griffiths:
Phone: 913.951.3786
Website: Jim Griffiths

Want more tips and breaking news about the housing market? Stay posted on my Facebook page or contact me.


Tuesday, August 27, 2013

10 Steps to Choosing and Purchasing Your Home (PART 2)

Be sure to check out PART 1 here!



So you are ready to buy a home.  It’s a big decision and there’s a lot to learn.  But with these 10 quick steps, choosing and purchasing your home will be easier and more seamless than ever before. This guide provides 10 key steps, information and tools in order for you to find, purchase and finance a home that meets your needs and preferences.
 
In a previous blog, I discussed the first 5 steps in helping you choose and purchase your home.  You can read that blog here.  Now, it’s time to discuss the last 5 steps so you can finalize that home purchase and get to the celebrating!

STEP 6:  Obtain a Mortgage
Securing a mortgage is oftentimes more complex and more expensive than a consumer may realize.  That’s why it’s important to be organized and find a competent mortgage loan officer.  Your ABR (Accredited Buyer’s Representative) has already helped other buyers work through the mortgage application process and can also provide valuable assistance.

How to obtain a mortgage:
  • Apply for a loan: Your ABR can help you understand the pre-application steps, the information your lender needs, the decisions you will have to make at application, the application costs and the application legal requirements.
  • Closing costs and The Truth In Lending Statement: Mortgage costs include appraisal and points (a fee based on the amount of the loan).  Depending on the loan, you may also be required to pay for mortgage insurance.  To help you see everything you’re paying for the length of the mortgage, you will receive a Truth in Lending Statement, which is a good-faith estimate of all of the costs associated with the mortgage.
  • Application and lender requirements:  Includes social security number, date of birth, photo identification card, paycheck, W-2 or 1099 tax form, employers, accounts, current assets, liabilities, current and previous addresses, sales contract.
  • Special situations:  Lenders may require additional information if you are: self-employed, compensated on a commissioned basis, separated or divorced, social security/pension/disability/any form of public assistance benefits considered as income, bankruptcy/foreclosure or any judgments against you in the past 7 years, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Loan Application
  • Other considerations: Be sure to consider points and rate options and keep in mind that your financial position must be the same at closing as it was when you were approved (don’t buy a new car or purchase anything major!).
  • Obtain homeowners insurance:  Before closing, your mortgage will require you to obtain homeowners insurance.  Costs and coverage will vary.
  • Escrow accountsDecide if you want to pay your property taxes and homeowners insurance policy on your own or if you would rather wrap them into your monthly mortgage payments. 

STEP 7:  Prepare for Closing Day
Many important details must fall in place before you close on your home.  Your ABR will help you stay on track.  The most important details include:
  • Completing a home inspection
  • Requesting an attorney review
  • Finalizing your mortgage
  • Getting ready to move
  • Attending a final walk-through
  • Preparing to pay closing costs

STEP 8:  Close
The actual, legal transfer of ownership is called closing or settlement.  Participants of the closing usually include:
  • You, the buyer
  • The seller
  • The closing agent, the title insurance representative and the escrow agent (one person may fill all these roles)
  • The real estate agents
  • Attorneys for the buyer and seller

During the meeting, you’ll sign many documents including:
  • The closing statement
  • The mortgage papers
  • A Truth in Lending Statement
  • Any additional documents required in your state

Be prepared to provide your payment of closing costs, proof of insurance and approval of inspections, too!

STEP 9: Move
You found your home!  The contract has been signed!  The closing date is set!  Now it’s time to move.  Be sure to plan for the moving day well in advance with these helpful tips:
  • Determine cost of moving:  Many people are surprised by the variety of expenses associated with moving, including packing materials, utility connections, insurance, cost of movers, truck rental, etc.  You can eliminate or reduce these costs by investigating moving companies, estimating moving costs and making a moving checklist.
  • Moving coverage:  Before you select a mover to help you, confirm that the company is insured and provides coverage for your belongings.  Three of the most common forms of insurance coverage are basic liability, declared value protection or actual cash value and replacement value.
  • Packing tips:

o   Begin packing as early as possible
o   When packing, go room by room
o   Make a list of what’s in each box
o   Label all boxes by room
o   Cushion the bottom and sides of boxes
o   Pack heavy items in smaller boxes
o   Packed boxes should not exceed 30 lbs
o   Fill you washer/dryer with clothes, linens and light items
o   Wrap and secure cords
o   Use rope or elastic to secure doors and drawers
o   Let the children help!

Take a look at an online moving checklist to help guide you too!

STEP 10:  Celebrate!
Congratulations!  You’ve worked hard to achieve your dream of homeownership.  I would like to wish you many years of happiness in your home.  Cheers!

Want to learn more?  You can receive your own home buyer’s toolkit at www.toddohlde.com.  Click on Contact Me to send me an email and request your copy.  All you have to do is provide me with your home address.  It’s as easy as that! 


Thursday, August 22, 2013

10 Steps to Choosing and Purchasing Your Home (PART 1)


So you are ready to buy a home.  It’s a big decision and there’s a lot to learn.  But with these 10 quick steps, choosing and purchasing your home will be easier and more seamless than ever before. This guide provides 10 key steps, information and tools in order for you to find, purchase and finance a home that meets your needs and preferences. 

Below are the first 5 steps to get you started.  Stay tuned for PART 2 where I will unveil the next 5 steps to keep in mind when choosing and purchasing a home! 

STEP 1:  Find a Qualified Buyer’s Representative
How often do you purchase real estate?  Once, twice, three times in your lifetime?  So you can hardly be expected to know all the ins and outs of such a major transaction complicated by so many details.  That’s when a qualified buyer’s representative comes in handy.

What is a buyer’s representative?  A buyer’s representative (also known as a buyer’s agent) is an advocate for the buyer--not the seller--in a real estate transaction. 

Why should you use a buyer’s representative?  A buyer’s representative can provide the expertise you need throughout the entire transaction, greatly improving your buying experience and potential results.  Plus, retaining a buyer’s representative seldom adds any expense to your transaction! 

Why choose an Accredited Buyer’s Representative?  A REALTOR with the ABR designation has completed Accredited Buyer’s Representative training, specialized education offered by the Real Estate Buyer’s Agent Council (REBAC).  REALTORS with the ABR designation understand the special needs of buyers.  They have additional knowledge and experience that takes them a step beyond an agent who only concentrates on listing property for sellers. 

What issues should you discuss?  After narrowing down your favorite ABR agents, be sure to ask some questions.  This will help you make your final decision.  Topic questions include experience and credentials, references, knowledge, representation, services provided, compensation, finding properties, personal support, negotiating, financing and related service providers. 
 Once you’ve found your ABR, you can discuss compensation (usually commission to the buyer’s agent) and then you may begin working as a team! 

STEP 2:  Assess Your Credit and Finances
Financial considerations and preparations are central to any home purchase.  In addition to helping you make better decisions about what you can afford in a home, a buyer who already has financing in place is in a better negotiating position when it’s time to make an offer. 
Assessing your credit card and finances can be broken down into 6 steps.  Be sure to check off each step before you purchase a home:
  • Determine credit status
  • Select a lender
  • Determine interest rates and duration
  • Pre-qualify for a mortgage and get pre-approved before you find your home
  • Determine how much you can affordOffer down payment and mortgage insurance

STEP 3:  Asses Your Wants and Needs in a Home
Deciding what you truly want, need and can afford in a home can be challenging.  But your ABR can play a key role in helping you sort out your options.  The following preferences should be discussed with your ABR before you purchase a home:
  • Basic criteria (i.e. ideal price, total square footage, type of home, number of bedrooms, number of garages, number of bathrooms, etc.)
  • Other home preferences (i.e. age of home, style of home, energy efficiency, floor plans, high priority home features, specialty rooms, storage needs, etc.)
  • Location (preferred areas/communities, commuting considerations, proximity to desirable features, views, etc.)
  • Lot characteristics (size and shape, landscaping considerations, home orientation)
  • Life at home: Take children, pets, live-in parents and others into consideration  
  • Trade-offs: If you can’t find what you want, how much are you willing to invest to pay for improvements? Are you willing to consider other neighborhoods that offer better affordability?
  • Resale: How long do you plan to live in this home?

STEP 4:  Search for Your Home
Your ABR can direct you to helpful sources of information for evaluating neighborhoods (although due to Federal Fair Housing Laws, they can’t tell you everything you want to know).  When evaluating a neighborhood, keep the following in mind:
  • Neighborhood Profile: Research population density and level of commercial development
  • Household Data: Family type, average household income and homeowner education level/occupation
  • Crime Rate
  • Quality of Schools
  • Amenities (i.e. shopping, transportation, parks and recreation, restaurants, nightlife, etc.)

After selecting a neighborhood, it’s time to view houses!  You can view homes on your own (at Open Houses, for example) or with help.  Remember that your ABR will help you refine your search if you can’t find what you’re looking for.  To get started, I suggest searching my website on the Home Search page to find your next home.  Another great resource is REALTOR.com.  This site provides online information on millions of properties, neighborhoods and other topics.

STEP 5:  Negotiate Terms
You found your home.  Now it’s time to make an offer.  Lucky for you, your ABR can provide valuable assistance on this regard--counseling you on market conditions, price ranges and negotiation strategies.  

How do I start to negotiate?  First, your ABR will perform a comparative market analysis (CMA) on the property. This will give you a better sense of whether the seller’s listing price is higher or lower compared to other properties.  Other negotiation considerations include if you’re an all-cash buyer, if you are pre-approved for a mortgage and if you do not have to sell your current home before you can complete the purchase.

How do I make an offer?  An offer must be a written contract.  Your ABR will help you use a standard form that is up-to-date with changing real estate laws.  Your ABR will also help you structure your offer and negotiation strategy.  Purchasing offers contain a lot of information.  Keep in mind that the more you demand, the less favorably the sellers may look on your offer.

What about contingencies?  A contingency is a term that must be met for an offer to become a binding contract.  They always weaken the offer, but some are considered normal.  Common purchase offer contingencies include approval of agreed-upon third-party inspections, obtaining specific financing terms, securing a specific job or selling your current home.

What about earnest money?  Earnest money is a cash deposit you make when submitting your written offer on a property to show your “good faith”. 

What are seller disclosures?  Many areas require sellers to disclose any known material defects.  Be sure to ask just in case.  Read and understand all documents.

What if there are multiple offers?  Don’t panic and immediately withdraw your offer.  It is quite possible that you have submitted the winning bid.  Stay involved for at least one round of negotiations, but also establish your maximum price.

What can a seller’s response be?  A seller’s response will either be:
  • Accept:  You will have a binding contract as soon as you are notified of the offer’s acceptance.
  • Reject:  You are released of any obligation.  The sellers cannot change their minds.
  • Counteroffer:  A seller may present a written counteroffer that includes the changes they want to make.  You are free to accept, reject or make a counteroffer to their counteroffer. 
  • These 5 steps will help you choose and buy your new home.  But wait!  There are 5 more steps to the home-buying process coming up next in PART 2 of this blog series.  Stay tuned for the next 5 steps including obtaining a mortgage, preparing for closing day, closing, moving and (of course) celebrating!

To receive your own home buyer’s toolkit or to schedule a private consultation to begin your search, visit www.toddohlde.com and click on the Contact Me page.  I look forward to hearing from you! 

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Kansas City Radon Levels on the Rise—What Should You Do?


There’s no denying it—the weather in Kansas City has been out of control.  One week we’re boasting 80 degree weather and the next, there’s a blizzard.  But something that we may not have noted is the severe drought that the KC metro region is currently experiencing.  As a matter of fact, we are about to enter month 21 of a large Midwestern drought.  What does that mean for you?  Radon problems.

What is radon?
Radon is a silent (and odorless) gas that can leak into homes from the natural decay of uranium present in all different types of soil.  Radon contains cancer-causing alpha particles that are drawn from parched soil through drought-driven cracks in home foundations.  The US Environmental Protection Agency has linked indoor radon to 20,000 lung-cancer deaths annually. 


Is radon in my home?
You are breathing in radon right now.  And we’ve all been breathing it in since we were born.  It’s a natural process that our bodies have learned to cope with.  It’s when we breathe in too much radon over a long period of time that we need to be weary of.  The homes with the highest levels of radon:
  • Have fractures in the foundation, which allows gases to travel through underground channels
  • Leave windows open often
  • Utilize attic fans
  • Have high traffic in and out of the home
  • Are geographically located where droughts are prevalent 
Other factors that could affect the circulation of radon gas include:
  • Soils and basement footings that shift
  • New furnace
  • New air conditioning system
  • Altered plumbing
  • Improved insulation
  • Structural additions to a home 

Kansas City radon levels
So if radon levels rise when a drought occurs, why is Kansas City experiencing such high levels?  After all, there’s plenty of wet snow on the ground!  As a matter of fact, despite the snow piles that have taken over the city, no handful of wet-weather events can cancel scientists’ predictions on the drought and radon levels in Kansas City. 

According to the Kansas City Star, KC is one of the nation’s hottest spots for indoor radon levels above what federal authorities consider safe.  Between 33% and 45% of Kansas City homes show radon levels higher than 4 picocuries per liter (the average home tests at a safe 1.3 pCi/L). 

Preventing & testing radon levels
How can you prevent high levels of radon in your home?  It’s actually quite simple!  First and foremost, it’s important to note that you should test your home approximately every 2 years.  The best time to test for radon is in the winter, when a home is sealed up and the furnaces are churning (so why not do it today?). 

In addition to bi-annual testing, the Kansas and Missouri governments are taking action to fight off the chances of radon sickness.  A bill introduced this year in the Kansas Legislature will make radon testing mandatory for every home sale.  This bill will also allow the state to compare the reported levels to health problems diagnosed in residents.  Currently, Missouri is not introducing a bill to require radon testing. 

So how much is this going to cost me?
A DIY radon testing kit can be purchased for less than $10 at your local home improvement store.  Once you have purchased a kit, you may need an additional $10-$30 for lab tests.  If you’d like professional advice, most services cost around $100-$200 in the Kansas City area.  If you decide to hire a professional, look for companies certified by the state of Kansas for radon inspection (Missouri does not have this requirement). 

If you find that your home has over 4 pCi/L, it is time to shop for a mitigation piping system.  These pipes, including installation, will run at about $700-$1,400.  Always remember—it’s better to be safe than sorry!